French Course Offerings and Descriptions

French Course Offerings and Descriptions

ELEMENTARY FRENCH I. This course is intended for students who have not studied French before or who have had very little exposure to the language. Newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures will be practiced through general classroom discussions and small group and pair work activities. Homework will require the interactive use of audio and video material(s), as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite students to explore the francophone world. Fall semester only, three hours.

102. ELEMENTARY FRENCH II. Continuation of French 101. Appropriate also for students with one year of high school French with grades of B or better. Beyond the expected acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical structures, students will be introduced to French and francophone culture through authentic materials (simple articles, films, videos, songs, recorded conversations). Homework is to be completed on-line: it consists of audio, video material(s), and of written practice. Students will continue to explore France and the francophone world. Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Spring semester only, three hours.

201. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I. This course is appropriate for students who have completed 101 and 102, or two years of high school French with grades of B or better. Its aim is to develop proficiency in the four major communicative skills: writing, speaking, reading, and listening. Students will acquire an expanded vocabulary by focusing on semantically associated groups. They will demonstrate a greater command of grammar and be able to write paragraph-length answers to questions, as well as the instructor’s guided page-length compositions. Through readings and discussions, they should attain a deeper understanding and appreciation not only of French culture, but also of the diversity of the francophone world. In essence, students, it is hoped, will progress from being list makers to being paragraph makers, from memorizing words in isolation to thinking in context, from studying grammar structures in a vacuum to using them as a linguistic and semantic support. Fall semester only, three hours.

202. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II. Continuation of French 201. Appropriate for students who have completed three years of high school French with grades of B or better. Its aim is to develop proficiency in the four major communicative skills: writing, speaking, reading, and listening. Students will acquire an expanded vocabulary by focusing on semantically associated groups. They will demonstrate a greater command of grammar and be able to write paragraph-length answers to questions, as well as the instructor’s guided page-length compositions. Through readings and discussions, they should attain a deeper understanding and appreciation not only of French culture, but also of the diversity of the francophone world. In essence, students, it is hoped, will progress from being list makers to being paragraph makers, from memorizing words in isolation to thinking in context, from studying grammar structures in a vacuum to using them as a linguistic and semantic support. Prerequisite: French 201 or equivalent. Spring semester only, three hours.

260. INDEPENDENT STUDY. Individual study of specialized topics in French. Sophomore standing and permission of the department chair and a faculty sponsor are required. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

270. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH. An opportunity to conduct supervised research in French. Sophomore standing and permission of the department chair and a faculty sponsor are required. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

305. CONVERSATION. This course enables students to develop skills of description, narration, and everyday conversational strategies through the observation and discussion of concrete objects, stories, and events. Oral presentations and group activities maximize speaking opportunities and listening practice. Media such as artwork, comics, films, and advertisements may be used to stimulate conversation and provide training in the detailed, faithful reporting of facts. This course fulfills the Speaking Intensive (SI) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: French 202, a 300-level course, or by permission. Fall semester only, three hours.

307. PRINCIPLES OF FRENCH GRAMMAR AND STYLE. This course will help advanced students to further develop linguistic skills and learn to write creatively in the target language. Through challenging exercises, examinations, and essays, students gain continuous practice in speaking, reading, and writing the target language. Emphasis is placed on the following topics: the identification and recognition of parts of speech and grammatical functions, adjectives (descriptive, possessive, demonstrative, and indefinite), pronouns (possessive, demonstrative, indefinite, and relative), simple and compound tenses of the indicative, present participle, pronominal verbs, and agreement of the past participle. This course fulfills the Writing Intensive (WI) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: French 202 or a 300-level French course, or by permission. Alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

308. PHONETICS AND LINGUISTICS. A systematic study of the sounds and sound patterns of French contrasted with English. Each student’s pronunciation in French will be evaluated with exercises assigned to correct and improve it. Offering both a theoretical and practical approach to the French phonetic system, this course includes phonetic transcriptions and an introduction to linguistics. Required of French majors and those desiring teacher certification in French. Prerequisites: French 202 or a 300-level French course, or by permission. Spring semester only, three hours.

309. ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. The goal of this course is to enable advanced students to develop linguistic skills and to hone their writing style in the target language. Through challenging exercises, examinations, and a creative paper, students gain continuous practice in speaking, reading, and writing in the target language. Emphasis is placed on the following aspects of French grammar: nouns, articles, compound tenses of the indicative (other than those studied in 307), pronominal verbs, negatives, adverbs, passive voice, prepositions, personal pronouns, conditional, subjunctive, and imperative. This course fulfills the Writing Intensive (WI) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: French 202 or a 300-level French course, or by permission. Alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

312. CONTEMPORARY FRANCE. The organization of this course is as follows: geography, history (from the Franco-Prussian War to the present), government and institutions, manners and mores. Students enrolled in this course will gain access to contemporary France and to its people through films, such as The Dreyfus Case, Midnight in Paris, and a number of documentaries. Through these and various readings, students will explore differences and similarities existing between France and the United States. Prerequisite: 300-level French course or by permission. Alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

315. BUSINESS FRENCH. Through this course, students acquire the linguistic skills and cultural information they need to prepare for the Chambre de commerce et d’industrie de Paris examinations. They familiarize themselves with business practices of the Francophone world. They are exposed to key French business topics and to essential career practices, as well as to cultural concepts particular to French businesses. Areas of concentration are: 1. la correspondance; 2. la micro-informatique, Internet, le courrier électronique; 3. la recherche d’un emploi; 4. la typologie des entreprises; 5. l’organisation des enterprises; 6. le marketing; 7. la banque et les moyens depaiement; 8. les transports et le commerce international. Prerequisite: French 307 or 309, or by permission. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

320. GENRES OF FRENCH LITERATURE I. A survey of French literature from its beginnings in the eleventh century to the seventeenth century. Through fiction, poetry, essays, treatises, emblems, and images, this course explores the relationships among literary creation, political events, religious movements, artistic innovations, and scientific discoveries. Readings may include La Vie de Saint Alexis, The Song of Roland, Marguerite de Navarre, Rabelais, Ronsard, Montaigne, Descartes, Pascal, and Madame de Lafayette. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: a 300-level French course or by permission. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

321. GENRES OF FRENCH LITERATURE II. A survey of French literature from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. Students study French literary history, movements, authors, techniques, and themes from the Enlightenment to Amélie Nothomb. Consideration may also be given to aesthetic and ideological similarities in other forms of cultural expression such as music and art. It is not necessary to take French 320 before French 321. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: 300-level French course or by permission. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

325. FRENCH THEATRE. A course designed to give students an overview of the history and evolution of theater in the French-speaking world. Readings may include Molière, Corneille, Racine, Beaumarchais, Hugo, Sartre, Ionesco, Beckett, and Césaire. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: 300-level French course or by permission. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

326. LE CINÉMA PAR LA CONVERSATION. This course begins with analyses, commentaries, and discussions of French films with which spectators in non-francophone countries are most likely to be familiar. Progressively, the emphasis shifts to films of the Occupation (1940-1944) and of the Nouvelle Vague (the 1960s), films which have been held significant in aesthetic, social, or moral terms by prominent critics and historians of French cinema. The materials and strategies used are meant to stimulate interest in the target language, to bridge the gap between “skill” and creative courses, and to develop the language proficiency of advanced students, as well as their ability to express themselves creatively in French. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: 300-level French course or by permission. Alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

330. WOMEN WRITERS IN FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE. This course serves to introduce students to the lives and works of francophone female authors from 1800 to the present. Its articulation is as follows: 1. Prise de conscience: Madame de Staël (France, Switzerland) and Simone de Beauvoir (France), with a side glance at Virginia Woolf (Great Britain); 2. Childhood and formation: Christiane Rochefort (France) and Nathalie Sarraute (France, Russia); 3. Sexual awakenings and passion: Colette (France) and Marguerite Duras (France and Indochina); 4. Matriarchy and exile: Antonine Maillet (Canada). The last third of the course focuses on three authors ironically joined under the banner of “French Feminism”: Luce Irigaray (Belgium), Hélène Cixous (Algeria), and Julia Kristeva (Bulgaria). This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: 300-level French course or by permission. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

331. POETRY. The goal of this course is to enable students to express themselves with increased sophistication and to practice “explication de textes,” this staple of French classical education. Students will study the biographies and also selected texts by nineteenth- and twentieth- centuries poets from France and the francophone world: Hugo, Nerval, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Valéry, Senghor, Césaire. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: 300-level French course or by permission. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

332. LA NOUVELLE FRANCOPHONE. A first goal of this course is to bridge the gap often experienced by students between the basic language work conducted during the first years of foreign language study and the diversified advanced work required of French majors. As they engage with authentic texts, students will demonstrate greater sophistication and enhanced complexity in their manipulation of language skills. A second goal is the reading and analysis of short stories and essays by writers of France and the French-speaking world: Maupassant (France), Flaubert (France), Sartre (France), Camus (Algeria), Sarraute (Russia, France), Gabrielle Roy (Canada), Antonine Maillet (Canada), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), and Zobel (Martinique). A third goal is to have students analyze short-story fiction (nouvelle/s) and demonstrate a greater sophistication and complexity in their manipulation of language skills as they engage with authentic texts. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: 300-level French course or by permission. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

340. ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND CONTEMPORARY CULTURE. In this course students expand on the skills of description and narration acquired in French 305 and move toward more sophisticated modes of discourse, such as discussing abstract ideas, constructing arguments, and hypothesizing. Topics covered may include current events, politics of the francophone world, fashion, sports, music, and philosophical ideas. This course fulfills the Speaking Intensive (SI) requirement for the French major. Prerequisites: French 202, a 300-level French course, or by permission. Completion of French 305 is strongly recommended. Spring semester only, three hours.

360. INDEPENDENT STUDY. Individual study in French directed by a faculty member, with permission of the department chairman. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

362. ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE LEARNING. A course designed to provide opportunities to teach various grammar aspects of the French language, and to examine and implement a variety of technical aspects and resources in the foreign language curriculum in preparation for student teaching. Teacher candidates will regularly reflect on their teaching experiences and will develop a portfolio of materials representing their teaching in the target language. Required of all students desiring teacher certification in a foreign language. Corequisite: French 364. Spring semester of the sophomore year, two hours.

364. PEDAGOGICAL MATERIALS. Introduction to the materials and resources of foreign language teaching. Analysis and preparation of instructional and evaluative materials in a specific target language. Required of all students desiring teacher certification in a foreign language. Corequisite: French 362. Spring semester of the sophomore year, two hours.

370. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH. An opportunity to conduct supervised research in French. Junior standing and permission of the department chair and a faculty sponsor are required. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

390. STUDIES IN FRENCH. Readings and discussion of topics in literature or language. Subject matter varies. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

460. INDEPENDENT STUDY. Individual study in French directed by a faculty member, with permission of the department chairman. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

470. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH. An opportunity to conduct supervised research in French. Senior standing and permission of the department chair and a faculty sponsor are required. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

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